Transform Your Bedroom with Good Vibrations, Thanks To Feng Shui


Sleep better by tapping into the principles of the ancient practice of feng shui

You’ve got the basics of a good night’s sleep down pat. You’ve invested in a high-quality mattress, good sheets and comfy pillows. Smart!

Yet your bedroom isn’t that sanctuary of bliss and relaxation that you had hoped for. Something isn’t quite right.

For a lasting sleep solution, look no further than feng shui, the ancient art that claims the placement of items within a space affects the flow of energy, which effects how we feel in that environment. In Asia, it’s serious business. Architects will hire feng shui masters to examine plans for buildings (before construction begins) to ensure the design creates the right kind of energy.

Want some good energy without the price tag of hiring a consultant. No need to discuss with a feng shui expert to find out how to inject some good mojo into your bedroom. We’ve done that for you and asked our own feng shui advisors how to create spaces to put you in the zen zone and on the path to a fantastic night of sleep.

Here’s what our Cracker Jack feng shui team advise.

Is bad energy in your bedroom wrecking your sleep? Feng shui can help to create a sense of calm…

“Feng shui is the art and science of balance,” says Kac Young, founder and president, The Feng Shui Specialists Inc., Santa Barbara, Calif. “When you live in balance with your environment, your body functions in rhythm and harmony with the space.”

She suggests removing anything that creates stress, fear or anxiety so you can rest more comfortably and sleep through the night. For example, the presence of electronics in your bedroom brings Yang-Fire energy. If you rid your sleeping area of them, your body will relax and find sleep easier.

Some people turn their bedrooms into offices, screening rooms, gyms and other activities not conducive to a good night’s sleep. The color of your bedroom matters as well. Bright, hot colors, like red, orange and purple repel sleep while soft shades like warm pink and peach soothe the soul and attract sleep.

Avoid placing mirrors around the space from floor to ceiling, Young suggests. This alerts the subconscious mind that this is a room for activity, rather than rest. Cover or paint-out those floor-to-ceiling closet door mirrors. Mirrors stir the chi and cause an excess of yang energy to abound. Hang a full-length mirror on the back of a door where you can close it away at night and get those big mirrors out of your bedroom.

Good, good, good vibrations when feng shui flows smoothly

“In feng shui, we place great emphasis on the master bedroom,” says Laurent Langlais, a feng shui expert and astrologer, based in London and Paris. In fact, it is the most important room to get right. By sleeping on average 8 hours, we receive a specific Qi (energy) that influences our whole life during the daytime.”

The well thought-out bedroom should do three things:

  • Recharge our own energy
  • Be conductive to a deep, uninterrupted sleep
  • Trigger positive emotions

Your master bedroom should be a yin space. (Yin is a more female, passive energy.) Our modern world is overly yang (a male, active energy) and your bedroom, if you want to sleep well in it, should be a sanctuary to leave all hectic energy behind. To create a yin space, hang heavy curtains on the windows to block the light entirely.

Also avoid anything stimulating, he recommends. For that reason, feng shui sees TV in the bedroom as an extreme no-no. Many people struggle with this idea, but it’s actually very smart advice. First, light and noise from the TV affects the whole room, including our brains. And we all know light and sound don’t exactly encourage sleep. And if you’re watching a scary or upsetting show, nightmares can play through your subconscious all night long. And we can’t forget that TV’s effect on sexual intimacy is, well, deflating.

The right position for your bed for better sleep

“I always say to my clients that not everything I recommend will resonate with everyone,” says Kirby, a New York City-based feng shui expert and CEO of KCUSA Inc. “Feel free to choose what you like and think will work for you. One or two fixes can help substantially, but the more you do the better the results.”

Some key considerations about the placement of your bed:

  • It should have a headboard and that it should be up against a wall
  • Don’t hang anything over your headboard
  • Place your bed so you have a full view of the entrance door to your bedroom
  • It shouldn’t directly face a mirror
  • When you lie down in bed, your head should be facing north, if possible
  • And though tempting, don’t put anything under your bed

The general idea is to eliminate as much clutter as possible in your bedroom. When it comes to a good night’s sleep, less stuff means more restful slumber.

According to Jeffrey Weldler, an interior decorating expert at Vänt Wall Panels (a type of user-friendly wall décor system), you can create a feng shui safety perspective by positioning your bed as far away from the door as possible without losing sight of the entrance to the bedroom. “Try placing the bed in the diagonal corner just opposite the door,” he says. “Proper bed placement will increase sleep and relaxation.”

Keep energy balanced in the room by not placing the bed in front of a window. Energy comes and goes through the window and blocking it can cause a disruption in flow. Utilize a wood headboard to provide support and strength for your head and induce a restful sleep.

Ordinarily, using a footboard would be construed as blocking forward movement in life. However, if your feet point out to the door, use a footboard, trunk, or small couch at the end of the bed to prevent your life force from draining while you sleep.

Use bedside tables with soft flowing lines versus square pointed edges. Right angles created by square edges create ‘poison arrows’ that point negative energy toward the bed and can disrupt sleep by inviting a feeling of unease.

Give some of these feng shui design tips a try and be sure to share with us how they worked for you.

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This blog does not provide medical advice. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on Restonic.com. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.